Bejoy Nambiar’s Wazir


Disclaimer: Views expressed in this blog is purely writer’s personal opinion and has nothing to do with the surname of either the writer or the director (who also happens to be a Nambiar.

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Amitabh Bachchan & Farhan Akhtar

Bollywood has indeed start 2016 with a great note in the form of ‘Wazir’, Directed by Bejoy Nambiar (who has helmed ‘Shaitan’ and ‘David’ in past) is again in top form with this thrilling film.

ATS Officer Danish Ali (Farhan Akhtar) looses his daughter in a violent shootout and is cast off by his wife Ruhana (Aditi Rao Hydari) for the tragedy, leaving him. In fit of rage, Danish carries an unauthorized task to kill the terrorist responsible for his daughter’s death, that leads to his suspension.

He soon meets  Omkar Nath Dhar, fondly known as ‘Panditji’ (Amitabh Bachchan) a chess grandmaster, with a similar loss who lost his wife and two legs in an accident and later his younger daughter. Panditji teaches him to play chess and uses it as metaphor to canvas a larger plot, in the process, they end up being the thickest of friends.

Surefooted that Omkar’s daughter was murdered and not an accident, Danish leaves no stone to investigate the suspicion that turns out to be true and discovers the culpability of a Kashmiri welfare minister Yazaad Qureshi (Manav Kaul) behind it.

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Aditi Rao Hydari

Against the backdrop of a nerve cells stimulating Chess, Bejoy explores the power of friendship and writers Vidhu Vinod Chopra and Abhijat Joshi not even once turn it into a melodrama which usually tend to occur otherwise. Two strangers are interconnected with a personal blow, motivate each other to distract from the grief to focus on their unified goal.

The conversation between Omkar and Danish are heart-felt, the dialogues are real, impressive and reflects our thought process on how we tackle our situations without using our mind and sense, Abhijeet Deshpande and Gazal Dhaliwal does justice to it. I was particularly moved by the sequence where Panditji says to grieving Ruhana that she has already lost her daughter and she shouldn’t let her mother loose hers, the silence around spoke volumes.

Parent’s inability to cope up with loss of child has been depicted on screen in the past, but in Wazir the actions are subtle. Both Ruhana and Danish leaves separately to find comfort in solitary; they doesn’t turn up to continue the vicious cycle of blame game instead makes a conscious effort to break the ice (orchestrated by Panditji). This couldn’t have been possible had the pairing been less captivating and casting Farhan and Aditi is indeed a casting genius.

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Farhan Akhtar & Aditi Rao Hydari

There are some breath-taking action sequences that glued me to my seat and the climax was specifically unpredictable, I needed some moments to get the hang as it urges us to THINK and it would be wise to conceal it for the audience. Music is arousing and ‘Tere Bin’ beautifully captures with lovely relation of the leading couples with slow motion so dear to eyes.

Farhan Akhtar is convincing as ATS Danish Ali, slipping into his role with dignity and Aditi Rao Hydari makes her presence feel as a grieving wife and mother in every frame even when she doesn’t appear. Manav Kaul is magnificient as the shrewd minister baying for manipulation; In the end, It’s Amitabh Bachchan who is remarkable as chess master Panditji, a soul who behind his cheerful chess addiction lies an agenda to settle scores.

Wazir is a thrilling film with a twist. It’s carefully written, skillfully executed and splendidly acted. Don’t miss it.

Nived Nambiar

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